“Resistance is Fertile! On Being Sons and Daughters of Soil”

Installation artwork by Bright Uguchukwe titled acid rain

Two weeks ago i attended a workshop in Cape Town called Resistance is Fertile! On Being Sons and Daughters of Soil. This was the beginning of an ongoing project that will culminate in a book on people and soils in the African Anthropocene that will be edited by Lesley Green, Nikiwe Solomon and Virginia MacKenny and has come to being through the Environmental Humanities South Program at UCT. the project has support from National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences and the National Research Foundation, part of a collaboration with Vegkop Farm in the Phillippi Horticultural Area of Cape Town.

The project aims to explore issues concerning relationships with soil, land and life that “traverse both nature and society” and which are important in the context of the global south and on the African Context. It aims to develop a scholarship and group of people interested in finding ‘new’ ways of relating to, reading, and thinking about the future of landscapes in the South. This is vital where soils, land and landscapes have for so long been bound up, regulated and managed in ways that carry on colonial legacies and injustices.

The project brings together an interdisciplinary group of artists, farmers, academics who are working widely in ways connected to this theme. Leading up to the publishing of the book,  the group will come together periodically  and workshop ideas and concepts that run through the various work people are doing.

At the workshop we listened to presentations from all over Africa as well as form South America. These sessions included a diverse range of presentations which explored relationships with earthworms and microbes to the place of soil in African literature, languages, art and music, to issues of land restitution and acid mine drainage. The workshop stimulated amazing interdisciplinary conversations and material for “thinking with”. It is a truly exciting initiative which will continue to grow over the next two years! It provided a space to explore a number of themes that are very relevant for the agri/cultures project – thinking about how GMOs fit into agri/cultural landscapes in South Africa and the wider continent